Mounting Options for RIB® Relays

December 31, 2019
Tech Tuesday

The relay products we offer are made to be installed in various locations. Our most common mounting means can be found on our Relay In A Box (RIB®) products. These prepackaged relays come in a plastic housing and have a 0.5″ or 0.75″ National Pipe Thread (NPT) nipple. These products can be mounted on a FIP conduit connection or through a knockout on an enclosure, using the included locknut. The images below show the housings we offer with this mounting option (images not to scale).

The NPT option is great if there is limited space inside enclosure that the RIB® will mount to. However, if space is not a concern, we offer most products in a modular, or track mount, version as well. These products will have a dimension that is either 2.75″ or 4″, which allows them to mount in our 2.75″ track (MT212 Series) or our 4″ track (MT4 Series). Some come with the track included, but with others it is sold separately. The images below show just a few of these products.

We also carry a line of relay products that can be mounted on 35mm DIN rail, and one product that can mount on DIN rail OR in our 2.75″ track. We sell standard DIN rail in 1 meter lengths and end stops as well. The images below show some of our DIN RIB® Series (DIN rail mount only) and our RIBAN Series (DIN Rail or Track mount).

If you mount our products a different way or would like us to offer a different mounting option, please let us know. We love to get feedback on our products, so we can continue to improve them!


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About the Author

Henry Smith is a design engineer at Functional Devices, Inc. He has a BS EET obtained from Purdue University in 2014 and a lifelong interest in electronics. As an engineer at Functional Devices, he gets to provide Technical Support to our customers, from distributors to specifying engineers and installers.

Henry enjoys providing tech support, as it allows our company to assist at every level of our product’s lifecycle and exposes us to interesting and unique applications. While not every technical question is unique, even answering a simple question or providing someone with the information in a timely manner can go a long way to helping him or her meet a deadline.